Distributed Systems

2008


  1. Are our homes ready for services? A domotic infrastructure based on the Web service stack ( and ), In Pervasive and Mobile Computing, volume 4, .

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  2. Fault diagnosis of a water for injection system using enhanced structural isolation (, and ), In International Journal of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, volume 18, .

    Abstract

    A water for injection system supplies chilled sterile water as a solvent for pharmaceutical products. There are ultimate requirements for the quality of the sterile water, and the consequence of a fault in temperature or in flow control within the process may cause a loss of one or more batches of the production. Early diagnosis of faults is hence of considerable interest for this process. This study investigates the properties of multiple matchings with respect to isolability, and it suggests to explore the topologies of multiple use-modes for the process and to employ active techniques for fault isolation to enhance structural isolability of faults. The suggested methods are validated on a high-fidelity simulation of the process.


    Keywords: Fault diagnosis, Fault isolation, Matching, Structural analysis


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  3. Towards Variable Service Compositions using VxBPEL ( and ), In International Conference on Software Reuse (H. Mei, ed.), volume LNCS 5030, .

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  4. Structural analysis for assessment of monitoring possibilities: Application to simple power system topologies (, , and ), In , .

    Abstract

    Any power system, either an integrated power system in an all-electric ship or a utility power system, needs to be highly reliable. Reliability of a complex system strongly depends on the possibility of detecting faults and isolating them from each other, i.e., on the monitoring potential of the system. The area of power system engineering that is concerned with the fault detection and isolation is called protection. As power systems becoming more and more complex, current standards for their protection should be adjusted accordingly to meet the challenges associated with increased system complexity. The standard approach used in power system protection is local, that is, current and voltage sensors are placed at or near individual breakers that open up to isolate a fault (short circuit). Coordination between breakers is achieved indirectly by setting the voltage or current trip points of the breakers differently so they open up in a desired sequence. Wide-area (global) protection is a new research direction. Wide-area protection schemes provide protection at more unified, global level than local protection schemes, and often operate as a backup level of protection. However, these schemes are usually developed manually, that is, the arrangement of protective actions within areas are made by hand, following heuristic considerations. More systematic and automated approaches are required for successful wide-area protection of larger systems. The objective of the current study is to adapt the model-based fault detection and isolation approach based on structural analysis to power systems in order to evaluate the monitoring potential of a given power system topology (architecture) in a systematic and automated manner. A new methodology is applied to evaluate the monitoring potential of a few simple topologies. © 2008 IEEE.


    Keywords: Fault detection and isolation, Power systems, Protection algorithms, Structural analysis


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  5. A new methodology for automated assessment of fault detection and isolation possibilities in large power systems (, , and ), In , .

    Abstract

    Any power system, whether an integrated power system in an all-electric ship or a utility power system, needs to be highly reliable. Reliability of a complex system strongly depends on the monitoring possibilities of the system. The area of power system engineering that is concerned with fault detection and isolation is called protection. As power systems become more complex, current methods for their protection should be adjusted accordingly to meet the challenges associated with increased system complexity. The standard approach for power system protection is local, that is, current and voltage sensors are placed at or near individual breakers that can open in order to isolate a fault. Coordination between breakers is achieved indirectly by setting the voltage or current trip points of the breakers differently so that they open in a desired sequence. Wide-area protection is a new research direction that provides protection at a more unified level, and often operates as a backup level of protection. However, these schemes are usually developed manually following heuristic considerations. This study proposes a new methodology based on the structural analysis of control theory, and provides the possibility of a systematic and automated approach to global power-system protection. © 2008 SIMULATION COUNCILS, INC.


    Keywords: Fault detection and isolation, Power systems, Protection algorithms, Structural analysis


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  6. Visualizing Compositions of Services from Large Repositories (, and ), In E-Commerce Technology and the Fifth IEEE Conference on Enterprise Computing, E-Commerce and E-Services, 2008 10th IEEE Conference on, .

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